Category: iPhone

Apple Explains Why Stage Manager is Limited to M1 iPads in New Statement

One of iPadOS 16’s key new features is Stage Manager, which allows users to resize apps into overlapping windows for an improved multitasking experience. Stage Manager also fully supports an external display, allowing users to work with up to four apps on the iPad and up to four apps on the external display simultaneously.



To the disappointment of some users, Stage Manager is limited to iPad models with an M1 chip, including the latest iPad Pro and iPad Air. In a statement shared with Rene Ritchie, Apple explained its rationale for this limitation by asserting that the Stage Manager experience "requires large internal memory, incredibly fast storage, and flexible external display I/O, all of which are delivered by iPads with the M1 chip."

Apple’s full statement, as shared by Ritchie:

Stage Manager is a fully integrated experience that provides all-new windowing experience that is incredibly fast and responsive and allow users to run 8 apps simultaneously across iPad and an external display with up to 6K resolution. Delivering this experience with the immediacy users expect from iPad’s touch-first experience requires large internal memory, incredibly fast storage, and flexible external display I/O, all of which are delivered by iPads with the M1 chip.

While the Stage Manager feature is limited to iPad models with an M1 chip, iPadOS 16 as a whole is compatible with all iPad Pro models, the third-generation iPad Air and newer, the fifth-generation iPad and newer, and the fifth-generation iPad mini and newer. The update is currently in beta for developers, with Apple planning to release a public beta in July. iPadOS 16 should be released to all users around September.

Related Roundups: iPad Air , iPad Pro
Related Forum: iPad

This article, "Apple Explains Why Stage Manager is Limited to M1 iPads in New Statement" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Read More

Apple Makes Further Adjustments to Dating App Rules to Satisfy Dutch Regulatory Requirements

Apple today announced further changes to its App Store rules for dating apps in the Netherlands in an attempt to comply with requirements put in place by the Authority for Consumers and Markets (ACM).



Apple says that after "productive conversations" with the ACM, it is making the following updates:

– Developers of dating apps in the Netherlands can use the StoreKit External Purchase Entitlement, the StoreKit External Purchase Link Entitlement, or both entitlements.

In accordance with the ACM’s wishes, we’ve made adjustments to the user interface requirements announced this past March for developers who choose to use either or both of the entitlements.

– We’ve adjusted the payment processing provider criteria for developers who wish to use either of the entitlements.

– The 3 percent commission discount also applies to in-app purchases that qualify for a lower commission rate (for example, App Store Small Business

– Program enrollees or subscription services after one year of paid service — both of which already qualify for a 15% commission).

Though Apple is making these changes, the company says that it does not believe these updates are "in the best interest" of user privacy or data security, and it is continuing to appeal the original ACM order.

As a reminder, developers of dating apps who want to continue using Apple’s in-app purchase system — which we believe is the safest and most secure way for users to purchase digital goods and services — may do so and no further action is needed.

We don’t believe some of these changes are in the best interests of our users’ privacy or data security. Because Apple is committed to constructive engagement with regulators, we’re making the additional changes at the ACM’s request. As we’ve previously said, we disagree with the ACM’s original order and are appealing it.

Apple has been clashing with Dutch regulators over dating app rules since December 2021, when the ACM announced that Apple would be required to allow dating apps to use alternative payment methods on the ‌App Store‌ in the Netherlands. Apple complied with the demand, but in a way that the ACM was not satisfied with, so Apple has had to make changes to the implementation several times now.

Apple initially attempted to implement the ‌App Store‌ changes in a way that would require developers to choose between using alternative payments or in-app payments, but the ACM demanded that developers be able to use both at the same time. Developers who use alternative payment methods in the Netherlands must still pay Apple’s commission, but the fee is reduced by three percent.

The ACM has been fining Apple for not complying with the rules as the Cupertino company works to meet the regulatory demands, and it has wracked up more than 50 million euros in fines.

This article, "Apple Makes Further Adjustments to Dating App Rules to Satisfy Dutch Regulatory Requirements" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Read More

The features you missed in watchOS 9

Staying informed in the moment is a powerful part of the Apple Watch experience, and in watchOS 9, capabilities have been added for a more impactful user experience. Here are all the best features Apple included in the latest Apple Watch update. Apart from the big features like new watch faces, improved sleep tracking, and a […]

Read More

Hands-On With macOS Ventura

Apple on Monday introduced macOS Ventura, the newest version of the operating system that runs on the Mac. Set to come out this fall, ‌macOS Ventura‌ is currently available to developers, so we thought we’d take a deep dive to show MacRumors readers all of the new features that are in the update.

Our latest YouTube video highlights Stage Manager, FaceTime Handoff, Continuity Camera, and more, with a full list of what’s covered in the video available below.

  • Mail – Mail offers up smart search suggestions that are more relevant to what you’re looking for, and there are options to unsend an email message, schedule an email message, get a reminder to reply to an email, and follow up on a message that you send that doesn’t get a response. Mail supports rich links, and it can let you know if you forget to add an attachment.
  • Spotlight – Spotlight now supports previewing files with Quick Look (just press the space bar), and it includes rich results for contacts, actors, musicians, movies, TV shows, sports, and more. You can also use Spotlight to search for text in images and to look for images by location, scenes, and image content. Spotlight can also perform tasks like setting an alarm, activating a Focus, or running a Shortcut.
  • Passkeys – Apple is aiming to replace passwords with Passkeys, a next-generation authentication technology. Passkeys use a two-key system, with one key stored on device and authenticated through Face ID and Touch ID. You’ll have one passkey per login, and passkeys will sync across all of your devices and will be accessible on non-Apple devices, too. Passkeys are almost impossible to be phished or stolen, preventing unwanted access to online accounts.
  • Shared Tab Groups – Safari Tab Groups can now be shared with friends or family members, so you can bookmark sites collaboratively for planning trips, working on projects, and more. Everyone has access to the tabs that are added, and Tab Groups update instantly for all participants.
  • Stage Manager – Stage Manager is a new multitasking feature that organizes your apps and windows into a single view so you can stay focused on your main app while quickly swapping between apps as needed.
  • FaceTime Handoff – Handoff supports ‌FaceTime‌, so you can start a ‌FaceTime‌ call on iPhone and transfer it to the Mac, and vice versa.
  • Continuity Camera – With Continuity Camera, an ‌iPhone‌ can be used as a webcam for a Mac. It works seamlessly, and it offers neat features like special lighting and a Desk View so you can show off what you’re doing on your desktop. It also supports Center Stage for keeping you in the frame as you move around the room.
  • Redesigned System Settings – System Preferences is now System Settings, and the design is more similar to the iOS Settings app. There’s a sidebar that lists all of the available settings so it’s easier to get to what you need without swapping between preferences.
  • Clock and Weather apps – Apple brought the iOS Clock and Weather apps to the Mac for the first time. The apps are identical to what’s available on the ‌iPhone‌ and the iPad.

‌macOS Ventura‌ is limited to developers at the current time, but Apple plans to provide a public beta in July. The operating system will see a public launch this fall.

Related Roundup: macOS Ventura

This article, "Hands-On With macOS Ventura" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Read More

Five Useful Features Coming to iPhone on iOS 16

While the headline feature of iOS 16 is the ability to customize the Lock screen with new fonts, widgets, and more, the update will include several other useful features on the iPhone, with five of our favorite additions highlighted below.



iOS 16 is currently in beta for Apple developers only, but Apple said a public beta will be available at some point in July. iOS 16 will be released for all users around September, and the update is compatible with the iPhone 8 and newer.

Live Activities

iOS 16 includes a new Live Activities feature that provides live notifications on the iPhone’s Lock screen. Live Activities will be useful for staying on top of live events or other tasks, such as keeping up with the score of a sports game, tracking the progress of an Uber ride, monitoring the status of a Starbucks order, viewing a timer, and more.



Apple said Live Activities is coming in an update to iOS 16 later this year, meaning that it will not be available when iOS 16 is first released to all users. Apple will be making an API available to developers to offer Live Activities in their third-party apps, so there will likely be all sorts of different use cases for this handy new feature.

Edit or Unsend an iMessage

iOS 16 introduces the ability to edit or unsend recently sent iMessages, as well as mark iMessage conversations as unread after opening them. Apple allows users to edit or unsend an iMessage for up to 15 minutes after sending it.



To edit or unsend a message, users simply need to tap and hold on a bubble and select the appropriate option in the menu that appears. iMessages that have been edited are marked as "edited" below the message bubble, and edited or unsent messages are still visible in their original form to users running older software versions like iOS 15.

Nintendo Joy-Cons Support

Despite not being advertised as a feature on Apple’s website, iOS 16 adds support for the Nintendo Switch’s Joy-Cons and Pro Controller. iPhones running iOS 16 can be used with either single left or right Joy-Cons, or both at once as a singular controller.



In the iOS 16 release notes for developers, Apple said the iPhone supports many additional Bluetooth game controllers on iOS 16, but Apple did not provide a list of the newly compatible controllers. This is on top of the iPhone’s existing compatibility with PS5 and Xbox Series X controllers since the release of iOS 14.5.

Apple Pay Order Tracking

Apple Pay on iOS 16 is gaining built-in order tracking information in the Wallet app for online orders completed via Apple Pay. The tracker provides an order’s estimated delivery date and indicates when a package is out for delivery.


Fitness App Without Apple Watch

Starting with iOS 16, the Fitness app is now available on the iPhone for all users, even if they don’t own an Apple Watch. The app features a daily Activity ring that relies on the iPhone’s motion sensors to estimate a person’s calories burned and steps per day.



For a closer look at iOS 16, watch our video walkthrough of some of the biggest new features.

Related Roundup: iOS 16

This article, "Five Useful Features Coming to iPhone on iOS 16" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Read More

Apple CEO Tim Cook Writes Letter to U.S. Senate Supporting Strong Privacy Legislation

Apple CEO Tim Cook today wrote a letter to the U.S. Senate advocating for strong privacy legislation at the federal level. The letter appears to be in response to a proposed bipartisan bill titled the "American Data Privacy and Protection Act" that would outline the types of data companies can collect from individuals and how they can use it.



The letter, obtained by MacRumors, is addressed to Maria Cantwell (D-WA), the Chair of the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, and Frank Pallone (D-NJ), the Chair of the U.S. House Committee on Energy and Commerce:

Dear Chairs Cantwell and Pallone and Ranking Members Wicker and McMorris Rodgers:

Thank you for your ongoing work on privacy legislation. Apple continues to support efforts at the federal level to establish strong privacy protections for consumers, and we are encouraged by the draft proposals your offices have produced.

We recognize that there are outstanding issues to be resolved, but the areas of agreement appear to far outweigh the differences. Your drafts would provide substantial protections for consumers, and we write to offer our strong support towards achieving this shared goal. With your work, coupled with President Biden’s call to better protect children’s privacy, it appears Americans are closer than ever to obtaining meaningful privacy protections.

At Apple, we believe privacy is a fundamental human right. It is why we have consistently advocated for comprehensive privacy legislation and contributed to the process whenever possible. It is also why we’ve always built products and features that protect users and their information by default. We do this by minimizing the data we collect, processing as much data as possible on a user’s device, giving users transparency as to what data is collected and control as to how it is used, and building robust systems to protect user data across all our products and services.

While Apple will continue to innovate and develop new ways to protect user data, only Congress can provide strong privacy protections for all Americans. The continued absence of this important legislation will unfortunately perpetuate a patchwork approach to privacy rights that leaves too many without the rigorous standards we hope to see as a result of your hard work.

We strongly urge you to advance comprehensive privacy legislation as soon as possible, and we stand ready to assist in this process in the days ahead.

Sincerely,

Tim Cook CEO, Apple

This article, "Apple CEO Tim Cook Writes Letter to U.S. Senate Supporting Strong Privacy Legislation" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Read More

iPad Home Hub Support Apparently Being Removed in iOS 16

As part of its rebuilt Home app experience in iOS 16 and iPadOS 16, Apple appears to be removing support for using an iPad as a Home Hub.



For those unfamiliar with what a Home Hub does, the HomeKit framework allows you to remotely control compatible smart home devices, but some features like location-based automation require a designated Home Hub, which remains powered on and connected at your home when you’re away.

For example, with a Home Hub, some thermostats can change the temperature to something more economical whenever you leave your home by using a virtual geographical boundary (geofencing). A Home Hub also allows you to use Siri to trigger actions when you’re away from home.

In iOS 15, Apple lets you designate an Apple TV, HomePod, or ‌iPad‌ as a Home Hub, but in ‌iOS 16‌, which is currently in beta, "Only ‌Apple TV‌ and HomePod are supported as home hubs," according to a footnote in Apple’s iOS 16 preview webpage. Despite this change, it should be noted that iPadOS 16 beta 1 still allows you to designate an ‌iPad‌ as a Home Hub. However, given Apple’s marketing webpage for ‌iOS 16‌ as well as interface notes in iPadOS 16, it’s likely that this ability will be removed in a later version of the software.

iPads still available as Home Hubs in iPadOS 16 beta 1

Apple hasn’t explained why ‌iPad‌ has dropped from the list of compatible Home Hub devices in ‌iOS 16‌, but it could have something to do with Apple’s announcement that ‌HomeKit‌ will support the upcoming Matter cross-platform compatibility smart home standard when the latter goes live.

Matter will allow ‌HomeKit‌ users to integrate more IoT device categories into their smart homes than ever before, and control them with the Home app and using ‌Siri‌. Matter is due to launch later this year, which is likely to be around the time that ‌iOS 16‌ is officially released to the public in the fall.

Related Roundup: iOS 16

This article, "iPad Home Hub Support Apparently Being Removed in iOS 16" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Read More

Craig Federighi Talks iOS 16 Lock Screen Redesign, macOS Ventura System Settings, and More in Annual WWDC Episode of ‘The Talk Show’

Apple’s senior vice president of software engineering, Craig Federighi, joined by Apple’s senior vice president of marketing, Greg Joswiak, have talked at length about iOS 16‘s lock screen redesign, iPadOS 16’s and macOS Ventura‘s new "Stage Manager" feature, gaming on the Mac, and more with Daring Fireball’s John Gruber.

In this year’s WWDC installment of The Talk Show, taped live from Apple Park at Apple’s new developer center, the two top executives discussed the latest software announcements, including the new suite of customization features coming to the iPhone lock screen. Federighi said that Apple wanted to offer users the ability to make their lock screen truly theirs.

During the 90-minute conversation, Federighi addressed recent controversy that has arisen following ‌macOS Ventura‌’s introduction of the redesigned System Preferences, now renamed System Settings. One aspect of the redesign that has gotten noted on Twitter is the removal of videos that demo macOS trackpad gestures. Federighi confirmed during the interview that those videos are coming back in a "new experience" in a future ‌macOS Ventura‌ beta.



Federighi said that despite what some may think, ‌macOS Ventura‌’s redesign of System Setting was not largely inspired by iOS. Federighi instead said that team’s main goal was consistency for users, saying System Settings on ‌macOS Ventura‌ is a "great interface."

Related Roundup: WWDC 2022

This article, "Craig Federighi Talks iOS 16 Lock Screen Redesign, macOS Ventura System Settings, and More in Annual WWDC Episode of ‘The Talk Show’" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Read More

Jigsaw Puzzle by MobilityWare+ Arrives on Apple Arcade

Get ready to relax with the new Apple Arcade addition Jigsaw Puzzle by MobilityWare+.

The game features more than 25,000 puzzles including options from Disney, Hasbro, and many more.

You can play a range of piece sizes and even enjoy music while putting the puzzle together.

Other features include the ability to show only edge pieces, storing puzzles in a tray, and having access to hints and a preview of the final product.

Just like other games on Apple Arcade, there are no advertisements or in-app purchases.

You can try out Apple Arcade with a one-month free trial. After that, it’s $4.99 per month. It’s also a part of all Apple One bundles.

A subscription can be shared with up to six other members of your family with Family Sharing.

To subscribe on your iPhone or iPad, open up the App Store tab and then select the Arcade tab.

Read More

Apple’s Rumored 12-Inch MacBook Could Be Pro Model With M2 Pro and M2 Max

Bloomberg‘s Mark Gurman on Thursday reported that Apple is considering launching an all-new 12-inch notebook at the end of 2023 or in early 2024. Gurman said it is unclear if the 12-inch model would be a low-end MacBook or a higher-end MacBook Pro.



Twitter user "Majin Bu" has since claimed that the model will be a new 12-inch MacBook Pro that may be equipped with Apple’s next-generation M2 Pro and M2 Max chips. In the MacBook Pro, Gurman said the M2 Max will feature a 12-core CPU and up to a 38-core GPU, while the M1 Max maxes out with a 10-core CPU and a 32-core GPU.

Apple has released both lower-end and higher-end 12-inch notebooks in the past. At the low end, Apple introduced an ultra-thin 12-inch MacBook that weighed just two pounds in 2015, but the notebook was discontinued in 2019. And at the higher end, Apple offered a 12-inch PowerBook G4 in the mid-2000s, prior to the original MacBook Pro.

In any case, Apple silicon chips deliver impressive performance per watt, paving the way for Apple to introduce ultra-portable, high-performance MacBooks without the thermal constraints of Intel processors that the company used over the last decade and a half.

Majin Bu has a hit-or-miss track record with Apple rumors, but he has gained some credibility recently after tweeting that Apple was planning a new 14.1-inch iPad Pro. The rumor has since been backed by very reliable display industry consultant Ross Young, who tweeted that his supply chain sources have confirmed that Apple is indeed planning a new 14.1-inch iPad Pro with a mini-LED display that could launch in 2023.

This article, "Apple’s Rumored 12-Inch MacBook Could Be Pro Model With M2 Pro and M2 Max" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Read More

UK Looks to Trigger Regulation Process to Target Apple’s Cloud Gaming and Browser Engine Restrictions

The UK’s competition watchdog seeks to "remedy" Apple’s restrictions on browser engines in iOS and cloud gaming through the App Store via a high-level regulatory process, the organization announced today.



The announcement comes upon the publication of the Competitions and Markets Authority (CMA) year-long study into Apple and Google’s mobile ecosystems, which finds that Apple and Google have an "effective duopoly" on mobile ecosystems that allows them to "exercise a stranglehold over these markets," including on operating systems, app stores, and web browsers. "Without interventions," the press release claims, "both companies are likely to maintain, and even strengthen, their grip over the sector, further restricting competition and limiting incentives for innovators."

The report identifies "a range of potential interventions" that could be taken to address the raised issues, but the CMA has specifically looked at ways to take "immediately targeted actions" using its current powers, including launching a wide-reaching "market investigation reference" into mobile browser engines and cloud gaming.

The study sets out concerns that Apple’s ban on alternative browser engines on iOS and iPadOS "severely limits the potential for rival browsers to differentiate themselves from Safari (for example, on features such as speed and functionality) and limits Apple’s incentives to invest in its browser engine." It also highlights that Apple’s browser engine restriction "seriously inhibits the capability of web apps," which is said to be "depriving consumers and businesses of the full benefits of this innovative technology," and the "key advantage" that Apple and Google gain from selling devices with their own browser app pre-installed.

Overall, the evidence we have seen does not suggest that the WebKit restriction is justified by security concerns. We note that Apple benefits financially from weakening competition in browsers via the browser engine ban.

Meanwhile, in recent submissions to the United States National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla have all explicitly condemned Apple’s WebKit restriction.

The CMA’s report also criticizes Apple’s restrictions on cloud gaming services on the ‌App Store‌. "Gaming apps are a key source of revenue for Apple and cloud gaming could pose a real threat to Apple’s strong position in-app distribution. By preventing this sector from growing, Apple risks causing mobile users to miss out on the full benefits of cloud gaming," the study claims.

The CMA’s proposal for a market investigation reference looks to determine what specific remedial actions can be taken to improve competition with regard to browser engines and cloud gaming on Apple platforms, potentially including orders that require Apple to make material changes to its practices. The study into mobile ecosystems is intended to serve as a basis for negotiating undertakings and imposing orders.

Market investigations are a high-level process through which the CMA can request extensive information from companies to draw conclusions and implement legally binding remedies. Market investigation references are seldom used since they are resource-intensive and impose a significant burden on companies, especially amid the threat of structural disinvestments and stringent behavioral solutions. Separately, the CMA continues to examine Apple’s ‌App Store‌ terms and conditions in a competition law investigation that started in March 2021, and the UK government is empowering its Digital Markets Unit with statutory powers to penalize companies that do not meet its rules with considerable fines.

Apple’s ecosystem is increasingly coming under intense scrutiny by governments around the world, including in the United States, Japan, South Korea, the European Union, and more, with a clear appetite from global regulators to explore requirements around issues like app store policies, app sideloading, and interoperability amid concerns about competition.

This article, "UK Looks to Trigger Regulation Process to Target Apple’s Cloud Gaming and Browser Engine Restrictions" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Read More

Apple Aiming to Improve Software Quality With iOS 16 by Encouraging Beta Testers to Submit Bugs

Apple is taking extra steps with iOS and iPadOS 16 to encourage those testing the company’s latest software to submit bugs and issues they experience so they can be fixed ahead of the software’s launch this fall.



Apple this week announced iOS 16, iPadOS 16, watchOS 9, and macOS Ventura, each major updates for their respective platforms. None of the updates will be available to the general public until later this fall, but over the summer, members of Apple’s developer program will test and run the software on their devices. The testing is meant to help developers prepare their apps for the updates and allows Apple to fix and receive feedback on the updates before they ship to millions of customers.

As the software are pre-release software, they are typically filled with bugs and issues. Beta testers can submit issues they find using the Feedback app that comes pre-installed. The process of submitting bugs and feedback is, however, sometimes complicated, and beta testers don’t always submit issues they encounter. The lack of feedback makes it harder for Apple to identify and patch bugs before the software launches, but Apple is hoping to change that this year.



Starting with ‌iOS 16‌ and iPadOS 16 beta 1 released this week, if an iPhone or iPad experiences a crash, reboot, or serious system-wide bug, the system will automatically prompt the beta tester to submit the issue to Apple, including any relevant logs that could be used by Apple’s engineer in fixing the problem.

Ahead of WWDC this week, Apple also shared tips on how to submit effective bug reports. Apple’s tips include making sure beta testers report bugs as soon as they happen, making sure the reports are concise and detailed enough to allow Apple to reproduce the issue, and ensuring any relevant screenshots or screen recordings of the problem are filed, if applicable.

Apple has over the years come under increased scrutiny from users over buggy and unstable software updates. iOS 15, the current version of iOS, was plagued by issues when it launched in September 2021.

With a slate of new software updates coming this fall, Apple is clearly hoping the new pop-up and advisory to developers will help it find and address issues before the updates launch, resulting in a more stable experience for customers. Members of the public will have a chance to test ‌iOS 16‌, iPadOS 16, ‌macOS Ventura‌, and ‌watchOS 9‌ later next month.

Related Roundup: iOS 16

This article, "Apple Aiming to Improve Software Quality With iOS 16 by Encouraging Beta Testers to Submit Bugs" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Read More
Loading